Leadership: The Longest Way is a Short Cut

Leadership: The Longest Way is a Short Cut,Leadership, John C Maxwell, Self Development, Bible, Christian Living, Leadership Skills, Character Building, Leading, Short Cut, Goal Then [Saul] waited seven days, according to the time set by Samuel. But Samuel did not come . . . So Saul . . . offered the burnt offering. Now it happened, as soon as he had finished presenting the burnt offering, that Samuel came . . . And Samuel said, “What have you done?” ~1 Samuel 13:8-11~
One of the most common obstacles to success is the desire to cut corners. But short cuts never pay off in the long run. If you find that you continually give in to your moods or impulses, then you need to change your approach to doing things.

Cutting corners is really a sign of impatience and poor self-discipline. But if you are willing to follow through, you can achieve a breakthrough. The best method is to set up standards for yourself that require accountability. Any time you suffer a consequence for not following through, it helps you stay on track. Once you have your standards in place, work according to them, not your moods. That will get you going in the right direction. Self-discipline is a quality that is won through practice.

As You Are Training Others . . .
And he went into the synagogue and spoke boldly for three months, reasoning and persuading concerning the thing of the kingdom of God. But when some were hardened and did not believe, but spoke evil of the Way before the multitude, he departed from them and withdrew the disciples, reasoning daily in the school of Tyrannus. And this continued for two years, so that all who dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus, both Jews and Greeks. Acts 19:8-10

Paul began a miniature seminary in Ephesus to teach students the ins and outs of the Gospel. For two years he rounded up men and trained them in the lecture hall of Tyrannus. As he mentored students, Paul remained committed to the people, to the process, and to the purpose. Consider how we can do the same as we develop others:

* Be familiar with your strengths and weaknesses.
* Know the people you wish to develop.
* Clearly define the goals and assignments.
* Allow them to watch you serve and lead.
* Hold them accountable for their work.
* Give them the freedom to fail.

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